Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Amoris Laetitia - Par. 30



30.   Every family should look to the icon of the Holy Family of Nazareth.  Its daily life had its share of burdens and even nightmares, as when they met with Herod’s implacable violence. This last was an experience that, sad to say, continues to afflict the many refugee families who in our day feel rejected and helpless.   Like the Magi, our families are invited to contemplate the Child and his Mother, to bow down and worship him (cf. Mt 2:11).  Like Mary, they are asked to face their family’s challenges with courage and serenity, in good times and bad, and to keep in their heart the great things which God has done (cf. Lk 2:19, 51).  The treasury of Mary’s heart also contains the experiences of every family, which she cherishes.  For this reason, she can help us understand the meaning of these experiences and to hear the message God wishes to communicate through the life of our families.



© LIBRERIA EDITRICE VATICANA.


Monday, August 29, 2016

Amoris Laetitia - Par. 29



29.   With a gaze of faith and love, grace and fidelity, we have contemplated the relationship between human families and the divine Trinity. The word of God tells us that the family is entrusted to a man, a woman and their children, so that they may become a communion of persons in the image of  the union of  the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.  Begetting and raising children, for its part, mirrors God’s creative work. The family is called to join in daily prayer, to read the word of God and to share in Eucharistic communion, and thus to grow in love and become ever more fully a temple in which the Spirit dwells.



© LIBRERIA EDITRICE VATICANA.

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Amoris Laetitia - Par. 28




28.   Against this backdrop of  love so central to the Christian experience of marriage and the family, another virtue stands out, one often over- looked in our world of  frenetic and superficial relationships.  It is tenderness.  Let us consider the moving words of  Psalm 131.  As in other biblical texts (e.g., Ex 4:22; Is 49:15; Ps 27:10), the union between the Lord and his faithful ones is expressed in terms of parental love. Here we see a delicate and tender intimacy between mother and child: the image is that of a babe sleeping in his mother’s arms after being nursed.  As the Hebrew word gamûl suggests, the infant is now fed and clings to his mother, who takes him to her bosom.  There is a closeness that is conscious and not simply biological.   Drawing on this image, the Psalmist sings: “I have calmed and quieted my soul, like a child quieted at its mother’s breast” (Ps 131:2).  We can also think of the touching words that the prophet Hosea puts on God’s lips: “When Israel was a child, I loved him… I took them up in my arms… I led them with cords of compassion, with the bands of love, and I became to them as one who eases the yoke on their jaws, and I bent down to them and fed them” (Hos 11:1, 3-4).




© LIBRERIA EDITRICE VATICANA.




Saturday, August 27, 2016

Amoris Laetitia - Par. 27


The Tenderness of an Embrace

27.   Christ proposed as the distinctive sign of his disciples the law of love and the gift of self for others (cf. Mt 22:39; Jn 13:34).  He did so in stating a principle that fathers and mothers tend to embody in their own lives: “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” (Jn 15:13). Love also bears fruit in mercy and forgiveness.  We see this in a particular way in the scene of the woman caught in adultery; in front of the Temple, the woman is surrounded by her accusers, but later, alone with Jesus, she meets not condemnation but the admonition to lead a more worthy life (cf. Jn 8:1-11).



© LIBRERIA EDITRICE VATICANA.

Friday, August 26, 2016

Amoris Laetitia - Par. 26



26.   Nor can we overlook the social degeneration brought about by sin, as, for example, when human beings  tyrannize  nature,  selfishly  and even brutally ravaging it. This leads to the desertification of the earth (cf. Gen 3:17-19) and those social and economic imbalances denounced by the prophets, beginning with Elijah (cf. 1 Kg 21) and culminating in Jesus’ own words against injustice (cf. Lk 12:13; 16:1-31).


© LIBRERIA EDITRICE VATICANA.